Care Found Alive in Japanese Crisis!

Shaken by earthquake, swept up by tsunami, shrouded in radiation and succumbing to hunger; despite the odds, the news continues to verify that Care has been found alive in the ruble of devastated Japan.

The positive evidence keeps flowing in.  Japanese people are reacting in ways that demonstrate Respect and Care at levels that seem incomprehensible to most of the world, considering the overwhelming crisis that has engulfed Japan.  People around the globe are still asking questions; they want to know what makes this possible.

In an earlier post, “Japan…Deep in Respect,” we highlighted the fact that the Japanese have built their culture on Love’s first Causal Factor, Respect. It didn’t happen overnight, but has included a 50 year process of teaching, encouraging and fostering Respect from the bottom up.  Now, we see the results of that mental formation or attitude of Respect that has been cultivated among the Japanese coming forth in Love’s action elements of Care.

Last week we explained that Care, in Love’s domain, can’t begin to happen until it is accompanied by the “intent to please,” resulting in action intended to fill a real need.  This week, we again look to Japan where we can see and observe Care “happening” in the darkest of situations; in the middle of unbelievable pain and suffering.

In The Technology of Love, the author explains that the “bedrock principle” underlying Japanese society is known as “amae” or “indulgent love.” It is the kind of love that a “loving mother” has for her infant,  and according to  American business author Boy De Menthe, it  is the “primary essence of their (Japan’s) distinctive social system” (TOL, pg. 4 & 339).

In a major catastrophe or tragedy, no matter where it takes place, there are always people who demonstrate significant Care to others.  But, it is in our everyday, simple living where Care has its most critical existence, down to the simplest thing such as giving a cup of cool water “to the least of” our brothers.

"Whoever gives one of these little ones a cup of cold water..."

It isn’t because of heroic efforts during tragedy that we are focusing on Japan, but rather because as a society they seem to have put Love’s action elements into practice in the ordinary…and it now shows up as extraordinary.

In a firsthand account detailed in his article, “Japanese calm and caring amid national crisis,” Bill Schiller speaks of his encounters in Japan shortly after the tsunami:

It was humbling and spoke, I thought, to the Japanese character under pressure: civil, strong, with a sense of community — and a concern for others — that deserves our admiration. I saw it on display everywhere last week: in survivors, civil servants, volunteers and just about everyone in the service industry: people holding it together against incredible odds, carrying on, meeting uncertainty with strength and grace. (Read Schiller’s complete article at thestar.com)

It is nothing less than a portrait of Care when we see people “concerned for” each other;  hearing or “listening” to the needs of others and taking action; “sharing” their gasoline; “comforting” fellow citizens; “assisting” homeless survivors; showing remarkable “attentiveness” in seeking out the customer who paid for the bowl of rice.

Yes, we’re looking right in the face of Love…Care’s action elements and their intensities…alive and well amidst the ruble.  Tragic as this situation is, it’s providing an opportunity for humanity to learn invaluable lessons and begin to build all our societies on the bedrock foundation of Love.

“Love is a very ‘soft tool’ (or ‘weapon,’ if used on an enemy),  but with a very ‘sharp point’ that always hits the two most vulnerable parts of the human system; the heart and the head.” Charles E. Hansen

Listen to our Podcast:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Now, we want to hear from you!  We look forward to your comments and questions.

TG Connection Team

The information in these blog posts and pod casts pertaining to the Causal Factors of Love, the elements/vectors of Love their intensities and their organization are from the work, “The Technology of Love,” by Charles  E.  Hansen and are used with his permission.  All copyright laws apply.

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Care Found Alive in Japanese Crisis!

Shaken by earthquake, swept up by tsunami, shrouded in radiation and succumbing to hunger; despite the odds, the news continues to verify that Care has been found alive in the ruble of devastated Japan.

The positive evidence keeps flowing in.  Japanese people are reacting in ways that demonstrate Respect and Care at levels that seem incomprehensible to most of the world, considering the overwhelming crisis that has engulfed Japan.  People around the globe are still asking questions; they want to know what makes this possible.

In an earlier post, “Japan…Deep in Respect,” we highlighted the fact that the Japanese have built their culture on Love’s first Causal Factor, Respect. It didn’t happen overnight, but has included a 50 year process of teaching, encouraging and fostering Respect from the bottom up.  Now, we see the results of that mental formation or attitude of Respect that has been cultivated among the Japanese coming forth in Love’s action elements of Care.

Last week we explained that Care, in Love’s domain, can’t begin to happen until it is accompanied by the “intent to please,” resulting in action intended to fill a real need.  This week, we again look to Japan where we can see and observe Care “happening” in the darkest of situations; in the middle of unbelievable pain and suffering.

In The Technology of Love, the author explains that the “bedrock principle” underlying Japanese society is known as “amae” or “indulgent love.” It is the kind of love that a “loving mother” has for her infant,  and according to  American business author Boy De Menthe, it  is the “primary essence of their (Japan’s) distinctive social system” (TOL, pg. 4 & 339).

In a major catastrophe or tragedy, no matter where it takes place, there are always people who demonstrate significant Care to others.  But, it is in our everyday, simple living where Care has its most critical existence, down to the simplest thing such as giving a cup of cool water “to the least of” our brothers.

"Whoever gives one of these little ones a cup of cold water..."

It isn’t because of heroic efforts during tragedy that we are focusing on Japan, but rather because as a society they seem to have put Love’s action elements into practice in the ordinary…and it now shows up as extraordinary.

In a firsthand account detailed in his article, “Japanese calm and caring amid national crisis,” Bill Schiller speaks of his encounters in Japan shortly after the tsunami:

It was humbling and spoke, I thought, to the Japanese character under pressure: civil, strong, with a sense of community — and a concern for others — that deserves our admiration. I saw it on display everywhere last week: in survivors, civil servants, volunteers and just about everyone in the service industry: people holding it together against incredible odds, carrying on, meeting uncertainty with strength and grace. (Read Schiller’s complete article at thestar.com)

It is nothing less than a portrait of Care when we see people “concerned for” each other;  hearing or “listening” to the needs of others and taking action; “sharing” their gasoline; “comforting” fellow citizens; “assisting” homeless survivors; showing remarkable “attentiveness” in seeking out the customer who paid for the bowl of rice.

Yes, we’re looking right in the face of Love…Care’s action elements and their intensities…alive and well amidst the ruble.  Tragic as this situation is, it’s providing an opportunity for humanity to learn invaluable lessons and begin to build all our societies on the bedrock foundation of Love.

“Love is a very ‘soft tool’ (or ‘weapon,’ if used on an enemy),  but with a very ‘sharp point’ that always hits the two most vulnerable parts of the human system; the heart and the head.” Charles E. Hansen

Listen to our Podcast:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Now, we want to hear from you!  We look forward to your comments and questions.

TG Connection Team

The information in these blog posts and pod casts pertaining to the Causal Factors of Love, the elements/vectors of Love their intensities and their organization are from the work, “The Technology of Love,” by Charles  E.  Hansen and are used with his permission.  All copyright laws apply.

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

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Trackback URL http://www.tgconnection.org/loves-basic-requirements-elements/respect/care-found-alive-in-japanese-crisis/trackback/

Care Found Alive in Japanese Crisis!

Shaken by earthquake, swept up by tsunami, shrouded in radiation and succumbing to hunger; despite the odds, the news continues to verify that Care has been found alive in the ruble of devastated Japan.

The positive evidence keeps flowing in.  Japanese people are reacting in ways that demonstrate Respect and Care at levels that seem incomprehensible to most of the world, considering the overwhelming crisis that has engulfed Japan.  People around the globe are still asking questions; they want to know what makes this possible.

In an earlier post, “Japan…Deep in Respect,” we highlighted the fact that the Japanese have built their culture on Love’s first Causal Factor, Respect. It didn’t happen overnight, but has included a 50 year process of teaching, encouraging and fostering Respect from the bottom up.  Now, we see the results of that mental formation or attitude of Respect that has been cultivated among the Japanese coming forth in Love’s action elements of Care.

Last week we explained that Care, in Love’s domain, can’t begin to happen until it is accompanied by the “intent to please,” resulting in action intended to fill a real need.  This week, we again look to Japan where we can see and observe Care “happening” in the darkest of situations; in the middle of unbelievable pain and suffering.

In The Technology of Love, the author explains that the “bedrock principle” underlying Japanese society is known as “amae” or “indulgent love.” It is the kind of love that a “loving mother” has for her infant,  and according to  American business author Boy De Menthe, it  is the “primary essence of their (Japan’s) distinctive social system” (TOL, pg. 4 & 339).

In a major catastrophe or tragedy, no matter where it takes place, there are always people who demonstrate significant Care to others.  But, it is in our everyday, simple living where Care has its most critical existence, down to the simplest thing such as giving a cup of cool water “to the least of” our brothers.

"Whoever gives one of these little ones a cup of cold water..."

It isn’t because of heroic efforts during tragedy that we are focusing on Japan, but rather because as a society they seem to have put Love’s action elements into practice in the ordinary…and it now shows up as extraordinary.

In a firsthand account detailed in his article, “Japanese calm and caring amid national crisis,” Bill Schiller speaks of his encounters in Japan shortly after the tsunami:

It was humbling and spoke, I thought, to the Japanese character under pressure: civil, strong, with a sense of community — and a concern for others — that deserves our admiration. I saw it on display everywhere last week: in survivors, civil servants, volunteers and just about everyone in the service industry: people holding it together against incredible odds, carrying on, meeting uncertainty with strength and grace. (Read Schiller’s complete article at thestar.com)

It is nothing less than a portrait of Care when we see people “concerned for” each other;  hearing or “listening” to the needs of others and taking action; “sharing” their gasoline; “comforting” fellow citizens; “assisting” homeless survivors; showing remarkable “attentiveness” in seeking out the customer who paid for the bowl of rice.

Yes, we’re looking right in the face of Love…Care’s action elements and their intensities…alive and well amidst the ruble.  Tragic as this situation is, it’s providing an opportunity for humanity to learn invaluable lessons and begin to build all our societies on the bedrock foundation of Love.

“Love is a very ‘soft tool’ (or ‘weapon,’ if used on an enemy),  but with a very ‘sharp point’ that always hits the two most vulnerable parts of the human system; the heart and the head.” Charles E. Hansen

Listen to our Podcast:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Now, we want to hear from you!  We look forward to your comments and questions.

TG Connection Team

The information in these blog posts and pod casts pertaining to the Causal Factors of Love, the elements/vectors of Love their intensities and their organization are from the work, “The Technology of Love,” by Charles  E.  Hansen and are used with his permission.  All copyright laws apply.

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

Leave a Reply

Wanting to leave an <em>phasis on your comment?

Trackback URL http://www.tgconnection.org/loves-basic-requirements-elements/respect/care-found-alive-in-japanese-crisis/trackback/

Care Found Alive in Japanese Crisis!

Shaken by earthquake, swept up by tsunami, shrouded in radiation and succumbing to hunger; despite the odds, the news continues to verify that Care has been found alive in the ruble of devastated Japan.

The positive evidence keeps flowing in.  Japanese people are reacting in ways that demonstrate Respect and Care at levels that seem incomprehensible to most of the world, considering the overwhelming crisis that has engulfed Japan.  People around the globe are still asking questions; they want to know what makes this possible.

In an earlier post, “Japan…Deep in Respect,” we highlighted the fact that the Japanese have built their culture on Love’s first Causal Factor, Respect. It didn’t happen overnight, but has included a 50 year process of teaching, encouraging and fostering Respect from the bottom up.  Now, we see the results of that mental formation or attitude of Respect that has been cultivated among the Japanese coming forth in Love’s action elements of Care.

Last week we explained that Care, in Love’s domain, can’t begin to happen until it is accompanied by the “intent to please,” resulting in action intended to fill a real need.  This week, we again look to Japan where we can see and observe Care “happening” in the darkest of situations; in the middle of unbelievable pain and suffering.

In The Technology of Love, the author explains that the “bedrock principle” underlying Japanese society is known as “amae” or “indulgent love.” It is the kind of love that a “loving mother” has for her infant,  and according to  American business author Boy De Menthe, it  is the “primary essence of their (Japan’s) distinctive social system” (TOL, pg. 4 & 339).

In a major catastrophe or tragedy, no matter where it takes place, there are always people who demonstrate significant Care to others.  But, it is in our everyday, simple living where Care has its most critical existence, down to the simplest thing such as giving a cup of cool water “to the least of” our brothers.

"Whoever gives one of these little ones a cup of cold water..."

It isn’t because of heroic efforts during tragedy that we are focusing on Japan, but rather because as a society they seem to have put Love’s action elements into practice in the ordinary…and it now shows up as extraordinary.

In a firsthand account detailed in his article, “Japanese calm and caring amid national crisis,” Bill Schiller speaks of his encounters in Japan shortly after the tsunami:

It was humbling and spoke, I thought, to the Japanese character under pressure: civil, strong, with a sense of community — and a concern for others — that deserves our admiration. I saw it on display everywhere last week: in survivors, civil servants, volunteers and just about everyone in the service industry: people holding it together against incredible odds, carrying on, meeting uncertainty with strength and grace. (Read Schiller’s complete article at thestar.com)

It is nothing less than a portrait of Care when we see people “concerned for” each other;  hearing or “listening” to the needs of others and taking action; “sharing” their gasoline; “comforting” fellow citizens; “assisting” homeless survivors; showing remarkable “attentiveness” in seeking out the customer who paid for the bowl of rice.

Yes, we’re looking right in the face of Love…Care’s action elements and their intensities…alive and well amidst the ruble.  Tragic as this situation is, it’s providing an opportunity for humanity to learn invaluable lessons and begin to build all our societies on the bedrock foundation of Love.

“Love is a very ‘soft tool’ (or ‘weapon,’ if used on an enemy),  but with a very ‘sharp point’ that always hits the two most vulnerable parts of the human system; the heart and the head.” Charles E. Hansen

Listen to our Podcast:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Now, we want to hear from you!  We look forward to your comments and questions.

TG Connection Team

The information in these blog posts and pod casts pertaining to the Causal Factors of Love, the elements/vectors of Love their intensities and their organization are from the work, “The Technology of Love,” by Charles  E.  Hansen and are used with his permission.  All copyright laws apply.

There are no comments yet. Be the first and leave a response!

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