A Book That Can Change Your Life

Eight-hundred seventy-seven pages long and 2 ½ inches thick.  That’s a pretty big and scary looking book.  It’s so complex and lengthy…could it have much of a future?

First published in 1922, this tome went on to become one of the most beloved books in American society; the go-to book for answers and advice on socially acceptable responses to every conceivable situation.

I picked up a worn copy, a 1937 edition, at a yard sale in Kansas on a whim.  I didn’t think much of it at the time.  Then I opened it. 

On page 1, Emily Post addresses the skeptics who think Etiquette is,  “of no more real service to the average citizen than a top hat;”

“As a matter of fact, there is not a single thing that we do, or say, or choose, or use, or even think, that does not follow (or break) one of the exactions of taste, or tact, or ethics, or good manners, or etiquette – call it what you will” (Etiquette, Emily Post, ©1937, pg. 1).

 

Call it Love

The way we address an envelope, introduce ourselves,  set our table,  the way we act, and the things we say, anywhere, anytime,  all matter because we should always consider others and society as a whole.

“Remember,” says Ms. Post, “Etiquette is merely a collection of forms by which all personal contacts in life are made smooth” (pg. 657). (Emphasis added)

“Remarkable!” I whisper to myself, scanning the pages of this once prized, but now discarded, gem.  From cover to cover, it’s dripping with respect, care, kindness, friendliness, courtesy…and Love.

There was a day when our society accepted and expected good behavior, ethics, morals and values.  Etiquette was common place.  It was taught around the family table, in schools, at church, in business circles, and mirrored in books and TV shows.

My hat is off to Emily Post.  She did a fabulous job of helping people understand how to treat each other; how to be caring, knowledgeable, respectful and responsible.  She didn’t do it at the order of, or under the banner of, any organized religion, government, university or corporate agenda.  Yet, people from all walks of life embraced it.

Too bad we threw out the book on manners.  The decline is everywhere.

 

What’s Wrong With Love?

The ONLY reason etiquette and manners ever had such a profoundly positive impact on our entire society in the past is because the principles and Elements of Love were at work, coupled with the Intent to Please!

It’s just that we haven’t been aware that it was Love…until now.

People are okay with the idea of manners, but Love, well….that’s a whole different animal!

In our research and experience at TG Connection and Corsense Institute, we find that people are really guarded when it comes to the word ‘love.’  Often, they don’t want to get too close.  A safe distance is best.

In some circles Love is “too sacred” to touch.  In other circles it sounds too religious.  And there are those who think it’s too fluffy and romantic to be of interest…or that it revolves around sex.

Add the word ‘science’ or ‘technology’ and it’s like yelling “FIRE!” in a crowded room.

The Technology of Love, is 583 pages long and 1 ¾ inches thick.  It’s scientific and scholarly.  One might think it’s just too complicated and complex to be “of service to the average citizen.”

But our mission is to bring this phenomenal information about the system of Love and how it works to the family dinner table, local schools, churches, businesses, and into every possible walk of life.

This is the stuff everybody needs; the go-to book that will help make all personal contacts in life smooth… just like manners, but much more important and on a deeper level.  (Stuff like peace, brotherhood, happiness…)

On the last page of Etiquette, Emily Post says,

“If we can keep these attributes and add finish and understanding and perfect taste in living and thinking, we need not dwell on the Golden Age that is past, but believe in the Golden Age that is sure to be.”

Imagine what we could add to that vision if we really dedicated ourselves to understanding and applying the science of Love!

Have you given thought to how you can become part of the TOL Movement?

Cath

2 Responses to A Book That Can Change Your Life
  1. Bonnie Ross
    September 29, 2011 | 4:58 am

    Cheers Fellow-Thrivers,
    When I was fourteen, I had study hall once a day in the library. After I finished my homework, I started going through books of all kinds, anything that interested me. I picked out the Emily Post Etiquette book. At first I looked up topics according to situations that came up in my life or in the lives of people around me. Eventually, I started to read the entire book, alphabetically. I was fascinated. The principles were applicable to everyday living.
    The first part of the book of Proverbs states, “Wisdom is the principle thing. Above all get wisdom. And with your getting, get understanding.” Then the entire book of Proverbs expounds on wisdom and how to get it. I believe that the Emily Post book is an elaboration of knowledge that when applied to human relationships results in an enhancement of one’s wisdom.

Leave a Reply

Wanting to leave an <em>phasis on your comment?

Trackback URL http://www.tgconnection.org/philosophy/a-book-that-can-change-your-life/trackback/

A Book That Can Change Your Life

Eight-hundred seventy-seven pages long and 2 ½ inches thick.  That’s a pretty big and scary looking book.  It’s so complex and lengthy…could it have much of a future?

First published in 1922, this tome went on to become one of the most beloved books in American society; the go-to book for answers and advice on socially acceptable responses to every conceivable situation.

I picked up a worn copy, a 1937 edition, at a yard sale in Kansas on a whim.  I didn’t think much of it at the time.  Then I opened it. 

On page 1, Emily Post addresses the skeptics who think Etiquette is,  “of no more real service to the average citizen than a top hat;”

“As a matter of fact, there is not a single thing that we do, or say, or choose, or use, or even think, that does not follow (or break) one of the exactions of taste, or tact, or ethics, or good manners, or etiquette – call it what you will” (Etiquette, Emily Post, ©1937, pg. 1).

 

Call it Love

The way we address an envelope, introduce ourselves,  set our table,  the way we act, and the things we say, anywhere, anytime,  all matter because we should always consider others and society as a whole.

“Remember,” says Ms. Post, “Etiquette is merely a collection of forms by which all personal contacts in life are made smooth” (pg. 657). (Emphasis added)

“Remarkable!” I whisper to myself, scanning the pages of this once prized, but now discarded, gem.  From cover to cover, it’s dripping with respect, care, kindness, friendliness, courtesy…and Love.

There was a day when our society accepted and expected good behavior, ethics, morals and values.  Etiquette was common place.  It was taught around the family table, in schools, at church, in business circles, and mirrored in books and TV shows.

My hat is off to Emily Post.  She did a fabulous job of helping people understand how to treat each other; how to be caring, knowledgeable, respectful and responsible.  She didn’t do it at the order of, or under the banner of, any organized religion, government, university or corporate agenda.  Yet, people from all walks of life embraced it.

Too bad we threw out the book on manners.  The decline is everywhere.

 

What’s Wrong With Love?

The ONLY reason etiquette and manners ever had such a profoundly positive impact on our entire society in the past is because the principles and Elements of Love were at work, coupled with the Intent to Please!

It’s just that we haven’t been aware that it was Love…until now.

People are okay with the idea of manners, but Love, well….that’s a whole different animal!

In our research and experience at TG Connection and Corsense Institute, we find that people are really guarded when it comes to the word ‘love.’  Often, they don’t want to get too close.  A safe distance is best.

In some circles Love is “too sacred” to touch.  In other circles it sounds too religious.  And there are those who think it’s too fluffy and romantic to be of interest…or that it revolves around sex.

Add the word ‘science’ or ‘technology’ and it’s like yelling “FIRE!” in a crowded room.

The Technology of Love, is 583 pages long and 1 ¾ inches thick.  It’s scientific and scholarly.  One might think it’s just too complicated and complex to be “of service to the average citizen.”

But our mission is to bring this phenomenal information about the system of Love and how it works to the family dinner table, local schools, churches, businesses, and into every possible walk of life.

This is the stuff everybody needs; the go-to book that will help make all personal contacts in life smooth… just like manners, but much more important and on a deeper level.  (Stuff like peace, brotherhood, happiness…)

On the last page of Etiquette, Emily Post says,

“If we can keep these attributes and add finish and understanding and perfect taste in living and thinking, we need not dwell on the Golden Age that is past, but believe in the Golden Age that is sure to be.”

Imagine what we could add to that vision if we really dedicated ourselves to understanding and applying the science of Love!

Have you given thought to how you can become part of the TOL Movement?

Cath

2 Responses to A Book That Can Change Your Life
  1. Bonnie Ross
    September 29, 2011 | 4:58 am

    Cheers Fellow-Thrivers,
    When I was fourteen, I had study hall once a day in the library. After I finished my homework, I started going through books of all kinds, anything that interested me. I picked out the Emily Post Etiquette book. At first I looked up topics according to situations that came up in my life or in the lives of people around me. Eventually, I started to read the entire book, alphabetically. I was fascinated. The principles were applicable to everyday living.
    The first part of the book of Proverbs states, “Wisdom is the principle thing. Above all get wisdom. And with your getting, get understanding.” Then the entire book of Proverbs expounds on wisdom and how to get it. I believe that the Emily Post book is an elaboration of knowledge that when applied to human relationships results in an enhancement of one’s wisdom.

Leave a Reply

Wanting to leave an <em>phasis on your comment?

Trackback URL http://www.tgconnection.org/philosophy/a-book-that-can-change-your-life/trackback/

A Book That Can Change Your Life

Eight-hundred seventy-seven pages long and 2 ½ inches thick.  That’s a pretty big and scary looking book.  It’s so complex and lengthy…could it have much of a future?

First published in 1922, this tome went on to become one of the most beloved books in American society; the go-to book for answers and advice on socially acceptable responses to every conceivable situation.

I picked up a worn copy, a 1937 edition, at a yard sale in Kansas on a whim.  I didn’t think much of it at the time.  Then I opened it. 

On page 1, Emily Post addresses the skeptics who think Etiquette is,  “of no more real service to the average citizen than a top hat;”

“As a matter of fact, there is not a single thing that we do, or say, or choose, or use, or even think, that does not follow (or break) one of the exactions of taste, or tact, or ethics, or good manners, or etiquette – call it what you will” (Etiquette, Emily Post, ©1937, pg. 1).

 

Call it Love

The way we address an envelope, introduce ourselves,  set our table,  the way we act, and the things we say, anywhere, anytime,  all matter because we should always consider others and society as a whole.

“Remember,” says Ms. Post, “Etiquette is merely a collection of forms by which all personal contacts in life are made smooth” (pg. 657). (Emphasis added)

“Remarkable!” I whisper to myself, scanning the pages of this once prized, but now discarded, gem.  From cover to cover, it’s dripping with respect, care, kindness, friendliness, courtesy…and Love.

There was a day when our society accepted and expected good behavior, ethics, morals and values.  Etiquette was common place.  It was taught around the family table, in schools, at church, in business circles, and mirrored in books and TV shows.

My hat is off to Emily Post.  She did a fabulous job of helping people understand how to treat each other; how to be caring, knowledgeable, respectful and responsible.  She didn’t do it at the order of, or under the banner of, any organized religion, government, university or corporate agenda.  Yet, people from all walks of life embraced it.

Too bad we threw out the book on manners.  The decline is everywhere.

 

What’s Wrong With Love?

The ONLY reason etiquette and manners ever had such a profoundly positive impact on our entire society in the past is because the principles and Elements of Love were at work, coupled with the Intent to Please!

It’s just that we haven’t been aware that it was Love…until now.

People are okay with the idea of manners, but Love, well….that’s a whole different animal!

In our research and experience at TG Connection and Corsense Institute, we find that people are really guarded when it comes to the word ‘love.’  Often, they don’t want to get too close.  A safe distance is best.

In some circles Love is “too sacred” to touch.  In other circles it sounds too religious.  And there are those who think it’s too fluffy and romantic to be of interest…or that it revolves around sex.

Add the word ‘science’ or ‘technology’ and it’s like yelling “FIRE!” in a crowded room.

The Technology of Love, is 583 pages long and 1 ¾ inches thick.  It’s scientific and scholarly.  One might think it’s just too complicated and complex to be “of service to the average citizen.”

But our mission is to bring this phenomenal information about the system of Love and how it works to the family dinner table, local schools, churches, businesses, and into every possible walk of life.

This is the stuff everybody needs; the go-to book that will help make all personal contacts in life smooth… just like manners, but much more important and on a deeper level.  (Stuff like peace, brotherhood, happiness…)

On the last page of Etiquette, Emily Post says,

“If we can keep these attributes and add finish and understanding and perfect taste in living and thinking, we need not dwell on the Golden Age that is past, but believe in the Golden Age that is sure to be.”

Imagine what we could add to that vision if we really dedicated ourselves to understanding and applying the science of Love!

Have you given thought to how you can become part of the TOL Movement?

Cath

2 Responses to A Book That Can Change Your Life
  1. Bonnie Ross
    September 29, 2011 | 4:58 am

    Cheers Fellow-Thrivers,
    When I was fourteen, I had study hall once a day in the library. After I finished my homework, I started going through books of all kinds, anything that interested me. I picked out the Emily Post Etiquette book. At first I looked up topics according to situations that came up in my life or in the lives of people around me. Eventually, I started to read the entire book, alphabetically. I was fascinated. The principles were applicable to everyday living.
    The first part of the book of Proverbs states, “Wisdom is the principle thing. Above all get wisdom. And with your getting, get understanding.” Then the entire book of Proverbs expounds on wisdom and how to get it. I believe that the Emily Post book is an elaboration of knowledge that when applied to human relationships results in an enhancement of one’s wisdom.

Leave a Reply

Wanting to leave an <em>phasis on your comment?

Trackback URL http://www.tgconnection.org/philosophy/a-book-that-can-change-your-life/trackback/

A Book That Can Change Your Life

Eight-hundred seventy-seven pages long and 2 ½ inches thick.  That’s a pretty big and scary looking book.  It’s so complex and lengthy…could it have much of a future?

First published in 1922, this tome went on to become one of the most beloved books in American society; the go-to book for answers and advice on socially acceptable responses to every conceivable situation.

I picked up a worn copy, a 1937 edition, at a yard sale in Kansas on a whim.  I didn’t think much of it at the time.  Then I opened it. 

On page 1, Emily Post addresses the skeptics who think Etiquette is,  “of no more real service to the average citizen than a top hat;”

“As a matter of fact, there is not a single thing that we do, or say, or choose, or use, or even think, that does not follow (or break) one of the exactions of taste, or tact, or ethics, or good manners, or etiquette – call it what you will” (Etiquette, Emily Post, ©1937, pg. 1).

 

Call it Love

The way we address an envelope, introduce ourselves,  set our table,  the way we act, and the things we say, anywhere, anytime,  all matter because we should always consider others and society as a whole.

“Remember,” says Ms. Post, “Etiquette is merely a collection of forms by which all personal contacts in life are made smooth” (pg. 657). (Emphasis added)

“Remarkable!” I whisper to myself, scanning the pages of this once prized, but now discarded, gem.  From cover to cover, it’s dripping with respect, care, kindness, friendliness, courtesy…and Love.

There was a day when our society accepted and expected good behavior, ethics, morals and values.  Etiquette was common place.  It was taught around the family table, in schools, at church, in business circles, and mirrored in books and TV shows.

My hat is off to Emily Post.  She did a fabulous job of helping people understand how to treat each other; how to be caring, knowledgeable, respectful and responsible.  She didn’t do it at the order of, or under the banner of, any organized religion, government, university or corporate agenda.  Yet, people from all walks of life embraced it.

Too bad we threw out the book on manners.  The decline is everywhere.

 

What’s Wrong With Love?

The ONLY reason etiquette and manners ever had such a profoundly positive impact on our entire society in the past is because the principles and Elements of Love were at work, coupled with the Intent to Please!

It’s just that we haven’t been aware that it was Love…until now.

People are okay with the idea of manners, but Love, well….that’s a whole different animal!

In our research and experience at TG Connection and Corsense Institute, we find that people are really guarded when it comes to the word ‘love.’  Often, they don’t want to get too close.  A safe distance is best.

In some circles Love is “too sacred” to touch.  In other circles it sounds too religious.  And there are those who think it’s too fluffy and romantic to be of interest…or that it revolves around sex.

Add the word ‘science’ or ‘technology’ and it’s like yelling “FIRE!” in a crowded room.

The Technology of Love, is 583 pages long and 1 ¾ inches thick.  It’s scientific and scholarly.  One might think it’s just too complicated and complex to be “of service to the average citizen.”

But our mission is to bring this phenomenal information about the system of Love and how it works to the family dinner table, local schools, churches, businesses, and into every possible walk of life.

This is the stuff everybody needs; the go-to book that will help make all personal contacts in life smooth… just like manners, but much more important and on a deeper level.  (Stuff like peace, brotherhood, happiness…)

On the last page of Etiquette, Emily Post says,

“If we can keep these attributes and add finish and understanding and perfect taste in living and thinking, we need not dwell on the Golden Age that is past, but believe in the Golden Age that is sure to be.”

Imagine what we could add to that vision if we really dedicated ourselves to understanding and applying the science of Love!

Have you given thought to how you can become part of the TOL Movement?

Cath

2 Responses to A Book That Can Change Your Life
  1. Bonnie Ross
    September 29, 2011 | 4:58 am

    Cheers Fellow-Thrivers,
    When I was fourteen, I had study hall once a day in the library. After I finished my homework, I started going through books of all kinds, anything that interested me. I picked out the Emily Post Etiquette book. At first I looked up topics according to situations that came up in my life or in the lives of people around me. Eventually, I started to read the entire book, alphabetically. I was fascinated. The principles were applicable to everyday living.
    The first part of the book of Proverbs states, “Wisdom is the principle thing. Above all get wisdom. And with your getting, get understanding.” Then the entire book of Proverbs expounds on wisdom and how to get it. I believe that the Emily Post book is an elaboration of knowledge that when applied to human relationships results in an enhancement of one’s wisdom.

Leave a Reply

Wanting to leave an <em>phasis on your comment?

Trackback URL http://www.tgconnection.org/philosophy/a-book-that-can-change-your-life/trackback/